Gualeguaychu, Argentina to Fray Bentos, Uruguay | Customs and Immigration

Uruguay

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5 months ago
Altitude:
47.0 masl
Contributor:
Life Remotely

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Description

Border name: Gualeguaychu - Fray Bentos Bridge
Closest major cities: Gualeguaychu, Argentina and Fray Bentos, Uruguay
Cost for visas: $0 . Cost for vehicle: $0 . Bridge toll: see latest entries.
Price for bridge from Argentina: see latest comments
Beware, no fresh food, meats, eggs etc. They will be confiscated.

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Came here on a Monday lunch time and it was empty. 1000 pesos for the bridge (we stupidly spent all our pesos so had to go back to the last town to get more money out!) The border crossing was very easy, friendly and welcoming (a nice change after a rude, unwelcoming hello in Argentina...)
We didn't have checks of our van going into Uruguay but I honestly think it's because the inspector was having his lunch and couldn't be bothered ha! Very relaxed crossing.

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Bridge toll for foreigners is: 1000 ARS or 450 UYU for passenger cars, campers cost 4100 ARS.

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450 UYU or 1000 ARS
So better to have some ARS.

But make sure to have UYU for Uruguay road fee. It is much more expensive in ARS!

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Border crossing quick and easy. No check in the car for fruit, meat etc. Bridge was 2300 Ars for double wheeled campervan.

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This place is permanently closed.

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Car price travelling from Uruguay to Argentina is now 350 Uruguayan pesos, or 550 Argentinian. It's also payable in US Dollars, but we didn't see the amount- we remember thinking it all worked out roughly the same.

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Good border crossing BUT we were here right the weekend after christmas and we had to be in line for 3-4hours. They did a „Blockabfertigung“ (I dont know the englisch word)..
So if thats your plan I recommend getting up early so that you can pass by faster :-)

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the prices for the bridge are raised, and we paid 1920 ars as we have double wheel in the back. normal cars pay 450 ars.
boarder was fast, they checked for food but as soon as we gave them some old apples they stopped looking.

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Now 460 arg pesos for a car. Border quick and easy. Everything goes on in the one place (exiting Argentina and entering Uruguay). They appear to do a good check of the car, opening all doors and asking about fruit and vegetables- but they’re really not looking that closely.

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Very easy border crossing! They checked the inside of our van (took the strawberries and the butter), the whole process is super quick. We have an American vehicle: we closed our Argentinian TIP (done with a Poder) and opened an Uruguayan one with our new paper (and changed our plates). We had the Senasa documentation for our cat (done in Santa Fe 2 days before).

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super easy cross . Romanian and American with American car. we had all paperwork in order and they were fast. they did not check our car. Hyundai Santa Fe.

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we paid 1500 Arg pesos coz we have double wheel at the back. normal price 350 pesos

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A360 / U270 bridge toll in each direction. (A60 / U50 for motorcycles)

By FAR the quickest border crossing in all of the Americas, except US/Canada. 20 mins total, either direction.

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One of the easiest and fastest border we crossed... (Argentina to Uruguay) we are French and we have a Chilean car, they only asked for passeports and padron and took like 45 seconds to check our van...

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I drive a car from Urarguay to Argentina. The border officer stamped my passport and ask for car insurance and refused me to pass. I go back to town to looking for car insurance and consulted three company. Last company say I can try to pass the other border Paysandu. I pass successful

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As said below, easy border crossing. But toll bridge costs A340peso or U270peso now. Didn’t even check our camper at all. Just told us to go get our car paperwork inside building.

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Now the bridge fee is 260 UYU, 270 ARS. So for foreigners it is cheaper to pay in ARS.

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Price now 220 Argentinian pesos or 260 Uraguay peso for cars

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We've used this border crossing 4 times, usually they check fridge but have never taken anything, this time they took cooked ham, meat, fruit, vegetables and eggs - beware!

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Argentina to Uruguay. Once again, this was my favourite border crossing (#22). Sooooo easy. So friendly. I cannot recommended this border enough if you want a worry-less crossing.

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fast and easy...but they checked our passport like hawks and also our paper...but everything good. no control of food they even didnt ask for...so we hided everything for nothing 😂

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That was quick. Took half an hour at max. Uruguayan officials were very friendly.

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Easy bordercrosding from Argentina into Uruguay. 20 min. total, but now they do not allow any fuits, veggies, meat etc. Like Chile or Argentina at this time.

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Pretty simple and easy border crossing. You pass booths on the Argentina side, ten cross tall bridge, pay toll (160p) then go to booth with green light. Get your pink ticket then go to Aduana to cancel your Argentina TIP and get new TIP for Uruguay

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bridge troll 160ARG 6/12/2017

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one of the easiest/fastest border crossings. you are just not allowed to take fruits, although the control was not very thorough.
130ARS bridge toll for a normal car

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No se permite cruzar el puente en bicicleta o andando :-(

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Not possible to buy insurance here today. Argentina and Uruguay require it. I then got shook down by the police for not having it.

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Side note: Watch out for clustered potholes when driving on any road outside of the ocean coast. All roads are in a terrible shape except the one on the coast, which is acceptable.

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bridge toll is 130 argentinan or 240 uruagury

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Border Crossing: Argentina / Uruguay Posted March 31st, 2014 by  Brianna [LINK: http://www.vangabonds.com/author/brianna/]  at  http://www.vangabonds.com/border-crossing-argentina-uruguay/

We cross borders by land in a CR-V with US passports and our two dogs. We do not carry drugs or weapons or disallowed fruit (usually). 

When, Where, and Which Direction: March 8, 2014 – Gualeguaychú, Entre Ríos, Argentina > Fray Bentos, Río Negro, Uruguay

What We Needed:
Passports,Argentine Auto Import Permit,Vehicle Title,Vehicle Registration (if plates are not listed on your title), andOfficial Dog Permits (plus duplicates).The Process:
The border sits on the eastern (Uruguayan) shore of Río Uruguay which can be crossed via the Puente Libertador General San Martín (San Martín International Bridge). There is a toll to cross the bridge which is administered on the Uruguayan side and can be paid in Argentine pesos or Uruguayan pesos. After crossing the bridge and paying the toll, the road feeds directly into the border crossing station. Without exiting the vehicle, pull up to one of the open booths and hand over your passports. The agent(s) will process both the exit from Argentina and the entrance to Uruguay at a single window. Drivers may be asked to show their Argentine Auto Import Permit at this time.
Pull forward further under the awning and park. An agent will direct you into the building to take care of your vehicle paperwork and will assure you that your van is fine to stay where it is. Enter the only building (it is on the left and brown upon approach) and go to the counter with the sign above it for Argentine Aduana. It is in the middle. The agent will take your permit, smile, say ‘all good’, and point you to the next counter which is labeled for Uruguayan Aduana. Tell the agent at this counter that you need a temporary auto import permit and then wait while he gets out the proper notebook. Present your title, registration (if your plates aren’t listed on your title), and the owner’s passport. The agent will fill out a short form, ask for a signature, and then send you on your way with a carbon copy.
Back outside, hand the agent your new import permit. He will glance in the general direction of the document and then do a brief vehicle inspection. He, or another agent, will likely also ask for dog permit papers at this time and will take the duplicates, give the pups a once over, and then bid you a surprisingly warm welcome to the country.

Costs:
We spent 1200 Argentine pesos ($120 USD for us at the time – read about the  blue market [LINK: http://www.vangabonds.com/the-blue-dollar-argentinas-somewhat-illegal-ish-dollar-market/]  to get an idea how much it can vary) for our dog permits the week before crossing (see below) and 70 Argentine pesos ($7 USD for us at the time) to cross the bridge. There was also one more toll in Uruguay before we got to an ATM, but they accepted both Argentine and Uruguayan pesos as well as US dollars, so we paid $3 USD there. There was a man at the border changing money, but you might have the ask the agent to point you in his direction if you were interested.

Dogs:
As with our  crossings between Argentina and Chile [LINK: http://www.vangabonds.com/border-crossing-argentina-chile/] , we opted to have legitimate papers for our dogs at this crossing. Most sources (for example,  Canada [LINK: http://www.inspection.gc.ca/animals/terrestrial-animals/imports/policies/live-animals/pets/rabies-free/eng/1332398392743/1332420396801] , but not the  United States [LINK: http://www.cdc.gov/animalimportation/rabies-free-countries.html] ) credit Uruguay with being a rabies free country, something we took to mean they weren’t going to look lightly upon a couple of canine visitors without papers. Also, there wasn’t a crazy wealth of information available about the crossing, leading us to accurately believe that it wasn’t a busy outpost with a bunch of plan Bs available if we hit a speedbump. So, we went back to the vet [LINK: https://www.google.com/maps/preview?ie=UTF-8&q=Veterinaria+Sebasti%C3%A1n&fb=1&hq=Av.pueyrredon+1801.+Veterinaria+sebastian+buenos+aires&cid=15349731585412493981&ei=p2oDU7jpAYTtkQfGxYGQBg&ved=0CL8BEPwSMAs]  that we had visited before in Buenos Aires and went through the process again. We say it was worth it. Uruguay requires a certain brand of something, heart medicine or flea guard or similar, so we got that in addition to the repeat health check and certificate costs. Fortunately for us, our rabies papers were accepted despite our assuming that they were going to be denied for being more than 6 months old. We went to the vet on Wednesday morning, picked up our papers on Thursday evening, and crossed the border on Saturday. Great!
On the day of the crossing, the dogs hung out in their kennel, smiling prettily when the gentleman agent requested their papers and then came around to say a brief hello. Skipping the vet and paying bribes as we did in Central America was much cheaper, but border crossing days are so much more relaxing when we have the accurate paperwork, especially in these countries where sliding under the radar isn’t much of an option.

Our Experience:
This was definitely one of the easier borders south of Canada. It took fewer than 30 minutes and included lots of pleasantries with little stress. We did have the option of taking a ferry from Buenos Aires to Colonia (they’re only 30 miles apart by water) instead of the 6-8 hour drive, but gas was cheaper than the ferry, we enjoy being on our own schedule, and, as a friend helpfully pointed out, when you add up the three hour ferry plus loading and unloading, getting there early, waiting at a busier border, etc, we didn’t expect to save that much time anyway.
Interesting note: For many recent years, the bridge at this border crossing was closed due to a dispute between the two countries over a new pulp mill being built on the Uruguayan side that Argentines claimed would pollute the shared river to which the Uruguayans said “no it won’t” in response to which a bunch of Argentines occupied the bridge in protest. For five years. Five. Years.

*shaking my head*
But it’s open again.
What do you think that was like for the guy who has been living at the bridge for five years? What is he doing now?

Photos at http://www.vangabonds.com/border-crossing-argentina-uruguay/

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This post is from Life Remotely . To read their full experience and see photos, see the detailed article at  http://liferemotely.com/trip-shenanigans/uruguay-updaes-from-colonia-to-concordia/319-argentina-to-uruguay-at-fray-bentos-border-crossing

Border name: Gualeguaychu - Fray Bentos Bridge
Closest major cities: Gualeguaychu, Argentina and Fray Bentos, Uruguay
Cost for visas: $0
Cost for vehicle: $0
Total time: 30 minutes
Date crossed: Saturday March 23, 2013

The StepsDrive over the scenic international bridge. Take photos, but don't stop. That makes the other drivers angry.Stop on the other side of the bridge to pay the fat $AR60 bridge toll.Drive to the booth that has the "turismo" sign out front.Hand over the passports for everyone in the car. You will be stamped out of Argentina and into Uruguay. (Two officials, one booth, amazing!)At the same booth hand in your Argentinian temporary vehicle permit. They will cancel it.The booth people will give you a pink slip of paper. This is your ticket to leave the border area.Drive forward and park on the right side.The vehicle owner goes into the building on the left. (Explain you are a tourist not just in transit, it might get you to the front of the line).Hand in the driver's license, passport, the vehicle title and the pink ticket. The official will have you complete a vehicle permit and may ask if you have insurance. He will return all documents and stamp your pink ticket.Return to your car and show the pink ticket to the customs inspectors. They may ask questions about the food you have and/or search your car for meat, dairy products, fruits and vegetables.Drive ahead a few hundred meters to the check point. The official will inspect your pink slip for the correct number of stamps, and then send you on your way.The Ferry: You can cross by vehicle ferry from Buenos Aires to Colonia. For three of us, plus the car, the cost was approximately AR$1,200. Prices change based on departure hour and day. There are 3-4 ferries per day, but you must arrive at the terminal 2 hours ahead of schedule to sort the border crossing paperwork. See the ferry's website [LINK: http://www.buquebus.com/]  for full details.

One-Year Permits: By default, you should be given a 1-year vehicle permit when you cross at this border. We were issued one without question. However, it seems that if you need one, they may tell you that the permit is only available in Montevideo and you'll have to drive all of the way to the aduana in the big city to get the permit extended. (At least this is what heppened to our friends at  Ruined Adventures [LINK: http://www.ruinedadventures.com/] .)

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