Border

Border crossing (sometimes allows older vehicles) | Customs and Immigration

Senegal
Staticmap?center=16.21824, 16.41465&zoom=13&size=1170x250&maptype=roadmap&markers=color:red%7ccolor:red%7clabel:c%7c16.21824, 16

Details

Last Visited: 5 months ago
GPS: 16.218240, -16.414650
Altitude: 0.0 masl
Place Website:
Phone:

Amenities

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Something not right?

Description

Because our Nissan X-trail is older then 8 years we’re not aloud to enter the country with it, unless we pay for a temporary permit which allows us to drive through the country within 3 to 5 days.
Luckily we had very sweet border officials, young guys that just started working at the border and were eager to help us out. They called their chef and anyone they could reach, and within an hour there were regular people trying to help us as long as we paid for the temporary permit; Martin kept on saying we only had 50 euros to spend and so of course, nobody wanted to help us for that price.

With the language barrier, we talked with the sweet border official and asked him what the possibilities were? Was the temporary permit really the only possibility?
He said that two weeks prior to our arrival, other travelers had the same problem and they left their car at the border and talked to the chef in St. Louis personally; this way they managed to figure something out.
But he did not know which price they paid or anything else about them.

We took a cab to St.Louis (2000 CFA when shared) and got a hotel in St.Louis, got on the public WIFI and call as many offices as possible as well as the Dutch Embassy. Martin found the government website of Senegal and filed a complaint because the website stated that tourists can get a temporary permit easily at the border; which obviously did not happen easily.

On Monday we decided to talk to the chef at the Duane Regional Point Nord, he was extremely friendly and first asked us to explain everything. Because we saw he was Muslim due to the Arabic paintings hanging around we used as much ‘Bismillah’ ‘ Inshaallah’ and ‘Alhamdullilah’ as possible.
He gave us two options; either a free five days to Dakar and back to the Diama border crossing, or an escort that would guide us, around Gambia, to the Guinee border.
The escort normally costs 150 euros, but because he ‘wanted to help other Muslims out’, he wouldn’t mind paying half of it. After Martin only put a 50 euro note on the table, he put 100 euros worth of CFA on the table, said that we should take all the money to the border where we’d pay for the escort.
Afterwards, the escort would come with us and we’d have to get an official document at the Duane Regional Point Sud before we could drive south to Guinee.

It was too good to be true, but when we returned at the border, everything was arranged, we paid; the officials got the official document for us and we were able to drive off to Guinee with an escort in our car.
Before we left, the border officials were mad at us and asked us why we filed a complaint on the government website stating they’re corrupt and were asking money, and why we called the embassy.
Martin kept on saying that he’s dad is ambassador so that he might have called.
In the end, we don’t know why everything happened quickly and easily; was it all just because of the complaint that Martin filed or really because we grew up Muslim?
We managed to get our car, older then 2008, through Senegal with an escort for only 50 euros.

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We got into Senegal from Mauretania within an hour. We needed to pay:
In mauretania:
- 400 park fee
- 100 overnight park fee (we slept in the park)
- 400 mru for the exit stamp
- 100 mru for a communal tax. We got a receipt for this and they wouldn't open the barrier if we hadn't paid. The guy wasn't in official clothing so I doubt it was really legit. But he was supported by the officials.

In senegal:
- 4000 cfa for the bridge
- 2500 cfa passevant. We got 3 days as we said our truck is very slow.

Very easy border crossing, no hassle from fixers.

We did not get the Carnet stamped either. Had to go to Dakar in 3 Days.

We arrived around 19:00, boarder was closed at 18:00. we could have managed to cross at that time, but decided to overnight at the boarder crossing. We didnt want to pay bribe.
No problem at all to enter Senegal with a 1975 VW Kombi. We had a Carnet, but still needed to buy a 3 day passavant. Carnet can be stamped in Dakar.
Super friendly stuff on bith sides. All payments are done with receipt. Nobody asked for bribes, just for „cadeaux“. We gave them some candies.

Opening hours: 08:00 - 18:00

We crossed the border from Senegal to Mauritania.
First police Senegal. Very correct and quick.
Then customs. They stamp the CdP without any problem. He knows what to do!
This all wothout any payment.
Then you cross the dam for CFA4000 with receipt.
At Mauritania side first to very small office for your visa €55 pp.
Then to police. He will ask money, but we refused. Then passport was given right away back to us.
Next through the first barrier to customs. They will make a passavant for €10 for the vehicle.
Second barrier and police will ask a fiche. No money asked
All done in 50 minutes.
Whole prpcess very correct and no hassle by fixers.
You can change money there for reasable rate. Just change a little and the rest in big city.

Heading north, super easy to exit Senegal, no fees. If they can stamp carnet out (which they did), why can't they stamp it in when going south???? 4000cfa or €10 to cross bridge (cfa is cheaper)

Exiting to Mauretanien: everything smooth, no payments required.

Bridge costs 4000CFA toll (with receipt), but managed to pay only 2500 without receipt.

Forgot to mention the 4000CFA tax for crossing the bridge/dam. Received a receipt.

Going from Senegal to Mauritania, I got sent to immigrations first. Hassle free, though they had some doubts Romania was in the EU.

The guy at the customs was visibly annoyed I had a CPD for my '04 motorcycle. He tried to find something wrong in my passport and CPD and stamped me out, eventually.

No bribes, no fixers, straightforward because the two buildings (immigration and customs) are one next to the another.

Immigration on the right and customs on the left. Do immigration first.

3 USA passports.

Immigration police wanted passport, drivers license and vehicle registration. They wanted 10 euro per Moto (30 euro) We politely said no. After about 30 minutes of waiting they gave all of our documents back and we went to customs.

Customs was straight forward and easy. It’s 2500 CFA each for passavant. (We have no carnet) They gave us 5 days which can extend in Dakar. They said we needed to buy insurance next door but we just went to St. Louis to buy it (on the app)

Took about 1 hour. Mostly just waiting for immigration police to give up on their bribe. I feel like I can say TIA now haha.

Totally agree with previous post, happened the same to us, we paid 250 EUR, 7 days passavant, extension possibillity in Dakar (15 more days, should be free, but some say 2500 CFA, dont know yet). BUT later, we found out, that on official website of senegales customs (in french only) is a statement, that the 8 year old rule only apply if you want permanently import your car there, and as a tourist, you obviously not gonna do that. So in my opinion, the possibillity could be showing them this statement, not sure if they would accept though...

Spent a day on this border observing the procedures, saw 6 vehicles older than 8 years cross. No problems for one with Carnet. For the others, it required "special permission" from the chef, who is either directly from or related to the St.Louis office. The going rate is €250 per vehicle, not negotiable (only one managed to get it a bit cheaper, not sure how).
This gets you a 7 day Passavant, with option for free extension in St.Louis or from Zebrabar (and Dakar, obviously). You essentially prepay the bribes for the St.Louis office and the service of someone diving to the border to give you your documents.

Note that it is not the border police that is asking money here! They just claim they cannot stamp you in unless you have the correct document, and they do not have them for you. Not even for a substantial "cadeaux".

The way to avoid paying is to drive into Mali first, and from there to Senegal.

Not as lucky as the previous post!
Got to the border pretty late and were the only tourists around, had to go with a transiteur who never let us speak directly with the officials. Had to pay total of 350€ for temporary import permit, insurance and one visa (for a non-European passport). However was processed fairly quickly but there is definitely room for negotiation I would say.
Never had to deal with the escort, got 7 days right away and possibility to extend in Dakar

Because our Nissan X-trail is older then 8 years we’re not aloud to enter the country with it, unless we pay for a temporary permit which allows us to drive through the country within 3 to 5 days.
Luckily we had very sweet border officials, young guys that just started working at the border and were eager to help us out. They called their chef and anyone they could reach, and within an hour there were regular people trying to help us as long as we paid for the temporary permit; Martin kept on saying we only had 50 euros to spend and so of course, nobody wanted to help us for that price.

With the language barrier, we talked with the sweet border official and asked him what the possibilities were? Was the temporary permit really the only possibility?
He said that two weeks prior to our arrival, other travelers had the same problem and they left their car at the border and talked to the chef in St. Louis personally; this way they managed to figure something out.
But he did not know which price they paid or anything else about them.

We took a cab to St.Louis (2000 CFA when shared) and got a hotel in St.Louis, got on the public WIFI and call as many offices as possible as well as the Dutch Embassy. Martin found the government website of Senegal and filed a complaint because the website stated that tourists can get a temporary permit easily at the border; which obviously did not happen easily.

On Monday we decided to talk to the chef at the Duane Regional Point Nord, he was extremely friendly and first asked us to explain everything. Because we saw he was Muslim due to the Arabic paintings hanging around we used as much ‘Bismillah’ ‘ Inshaallah’ and ‘Alhamdullilah’ as possible.
He gave us two options; either a free five days to Dakar and back to the Diama border crossing, or an escort that would guide us, around Gambia, to the Guinee border.
The escort normally costs 150 euros, but because he ‘wanted to help other Muslims out’, he wouldn’t mind paying half of it. After Martin only put a 50 euro note on the table, he put 100 euros worth of CFA on the table, said that we should take all the money to the border where we’d pay for the escort.
Afterwards, the escort would come with us and we’d have to get an official document at the Duane Regional Point Sud before we could drive south to Guinee.

It was too good to be true, but when we returned at the border, everything was arranged, we paid; the officials got the official document for us and we were able to drive off to Guinee with an escort in our car.
Before we left, the border officials were mad at us and asked us why we filed a complaint on the government website stating they’re corrupt and were asking money, and why we called the embassy.
Martin kept on saying that he’s dad is ambassador so that he might have called.
In the end, we don’t know why everything happened quickly and easily; was it all just because of the complaint that Martin filed or really because we grew up Muslim?
We managed to get our car, older then 2008, through Senegal with an escort for only 50 euros.